News

Policy Dialogue in London: Corporate Peace: private sector strategies for conflict prevention, peacebuilding and sustainable development

On 18 of July, the London School of Economics and Political Science organised a Policy Dialogue roundtable to discuss the challenges, barriers and opportunities for enhanced collaboration between public, private and civil society stakeholders to strengthen peace and resilience-building and conflict prevention initiatives. 

The Roundtable convened representatives from global corporations, other private sector organisations (law firms, consultancies) and UK government officials to discuss the challenges, barriers and opportunities for enhanced collaboration between public, private and civil society stakeholders to strengthen peace and resilience-building and conflict prevention initiatives.

The Roundtable heard presentations on the research findings of WOSCAP and the proposition that effective peacebuilding should recognize:

  • The importance of inclusivity and local ownership;
  • A wide range of stakeholders and multiple relationships at policy level and on the ground;
  • A focus on both actors + the ways they associate, mobilise, enact change and respond to insecurity;
  • A case study of how the private sector can contribute to resilience building in Guinea;
  • Ideas on how to build partnerships between the private sector, government and communities based on human security.

The discussion brought the corporate decision to engage and how. That there is a need to evaluate the nature of corporate ‘resources' for engaging in development and governance issues. At the managing multi-stakeholder interventions level is easier to manage changes in the external environment if the community has been part of negotiating agreements with the company. When a company is operating in a ‘donor like' manner by providing one-off benefits e.g. helping build a school, health facilities or the like, managing the impact of changes (such as job cuts, changes to original commitments) is more difficult unless there has been an extended process of interaction and communication beforehand. Mistakes arise through opacity and rapid changes which stakeholders cannot adapt to. Integrating the private sector into peace negotiations is also important.  

 

For further details on corporate decision to engage and about managing multi-stakeholder interventions, please access the document here.


Videos

Why is Local Ownership to Peacebuilding Important?

Mary Martin on the Whole-of-Society Approach

Véronique Dudouet on the Research of the WOSCAP Project

Mary Martin on the Importance of the Whole-of-Society Approach